header image

The bridge at Remagen


The bridge at Remagen On the 10th of December, the 2nd Engineers first saw the Rhine. From the 10th to the 13th the Regiment lived in Remagen-on-the-Rhine, and on the 14th, crossed the Rhine on the large steel bridge at Remagen, which was built by Allied prisoners of war.
December 11, 1918 East end of Remagen Bridge. On the 11th and 12th the 2nd Engineers were used in improving the approaches to the bridge over the Rhine at Remagen. This photograph, taken on December 11, 1918, is almost certainly the 2nd Engineers making the East approach to the bridge at Remagen ready for the crossing of the 2nd Division.
December 13, 1918 East end of Remagen Bridge. December 13, 1918 East end of Remagen Bridge.
15th Field Artillery crossing the Rhine at Remagen on December 14, 1918. 15th Field Artillery crossing the Rhine at Remagen on December 13, 1918.
 

The Ludendorff Bridge was originally built during World War I as a means of moving troops and logistics west over the Rhine to reinforce the Western Front. The bridge was designed by Karl Wiener, an architect from Mannheim. It was 325 metres (1,066 ft) long, had a clearance of 14.8 metres (49 ft) above the normal water level of the Rhine, and its highest point measured 29.25 metres (96.0 ft). The bridge was designed to be defended by troops with towers on each bank with machine gun slits in the towers. The bridge carried two railway tracks and a pedestrian walkway. During World War II, one track was planked over to allow vehicular traffic. Wikipedia

 
Last Update: 03/28/2017 5:19 AM Sitemap Search this Site ©2002-2017 MG Ryder & Contributors